Read up on our latest Dharma teachings

Let the Breeze Carry Away White Clouds

Recently, a middle-aged friend was laid off from work. In a fit of pique, he complained that his employer was unfair in not letting go instead the co-workers newer than him. Pitying himself, he holed up completely at home and became increasingly depressed. This upset his wife and children and seriously affected their mood. Thus, life in the peaceful family was turned upside down. Everything that happens to us is, indeed, due to karma. Quite often, for example, we may not get the credit we deserve for having tried our very best, but to make your boss at work happy takes things working together, such as making consistent efforts, being flexible but smart, and, importantly, having a lot of work experience. The one thing most often overlooked at workplace is getting along with your supervisors and co-workers. The time, place and how you work with people all need to be...

The Buddha Mother Great Peacock Wisdom King Sutra and its Significance

Translated by: Andrew Yang As the date approaches in March when our temple hosts a large-scale chanting and prayer ceremony for the Buddha Mother Great Peacock Wisdom King Sutra (i.e., the Mahamayuri Vidyarajni Sutra), I have been frequently asked what kind of classic the sutra is and what its historical origin and scripture sources are. Since our International Buddhist Temple already has an established schedule of regular ceremonies, some friends wonder why we need a special ceremony to address this sutra. Attempting to answer some of their questions, I am going to offer what I know for the sake of discussion. Please enlighten me with your wisdom where I am inadequate. The meaning of its title The Buddha Mother Great Peacock Wisdom King Sutra, listed as No. 982 in Volume 19 of the Taisho Newly-Published Tripitaka, was translated by tantric master Bukong of the Tang dynasty. Together with the Benevolent...

Message to Welcome the New Year

Good morning and welcome to all our guests and visitors joining us to celebrate the arrival of the Chinese New Year. I would like to begin by wishing everyone a happy, prosperous and healthy year of 2019. At this auspicious moment, the first hour of the New Year, let us talk about a very important concept. We all know that life has values.  What are the values of life? The Buddha talked about this subject in various sutras. We can summarize them by saying we must devote ourselves to attain 3 important values of life: The first value is “To be good”; we want to be a good person. The second value is “To be happy”; we want to be happy. The third value is “To be wise”; we want to be wise. When people asked me what are the values of life. I simply answer: “to be good, to...

Venerable Master Chien Ju and the Peacock King Sutra: An Interview with Venerable Tzu Chieh

Translated by: Andrew Yang The Peacock King Sutra (also known as the Mahamayuri Vidyarajni Sutra) is one of the three Buddhist classics used in chanting and prayer ceremonies for protection, blessing and disaster eradication. It is a powerful text that effectively responds to invocations. The sutra, however, after tantric Buddhism reached Japan during the Tang dynasty, was lost for a long time in the Mandarin-speaking China until the 1980s, when Venerable Master Chien Ju started to work assiduously for its revival. He later formed the Peacock King Lineage sangha out of Kaicheng Monastery of Taiwan, which he dedicated to propagating the Peacock King Sutra. Venerable Shan Ci had the privilege to make the master’s acquaintance and receive his teachings. In March 2017, Yilan Peacock King Temple in Taiwan held a seven-day Peacock King Sutra Chanting Ceremony. While attending the event, she had an opportunity to interview temple abbot Venerable Tzu...

Living Compassion: Early Work in Guizhou, China

Translated by: Andrew Yang A poor province known for its rugged terrain in southwestern China, Guizhou for a long time has seen many, if not most, of its abled-bodied adults heading off for jobs in far-away places, leaving behind children and elders in their family. For these and other reasons, in this mountainous region are many families not only suffering from poverty and illness, but children with single parents or no parental care, elderly people who have lost spouses, and those stricken by accidents and injuries. More than usual, some of these families find themselves in desperate need of help but may not have the government agencies’ relief services within reach. It is in these circumstances that Living Compassion has risen to the occasion. Living Compassion, a charity program set up by the International Buddhist Temple for southern China, began serving areas of Guizhou in autumn 2017. By mid-2018, it...

The Merits and Virtues of Alms Giving

Building temples A friend asked, "What merit and virtue is there in building a temple? Has anything been written in the scriptures?" According to tradition, in the time of Sakyamuni Buddha, an elder in Sravasti named Sudatta searched for a scenic spot to build a fine monastery for Buddha to better promote the Dharma. Sudatta received assistance from Prince Jeta, who donated a big piece of land, and together they built a monastery with a total of 1,200 rooms. While they were measuring the plot, Sariputra smiled to them and said, “As I observe with my deva eye, when you are still doing the foundation measurements before even breaking soil, your future blessings have already been set. The merits and virtues of creating a Buddhist temple are truly great!” According to Avadana Sutra, the stupa of Kassapa Buddha had been in disrepair for a long time when one day, an...

Seven-day Dharma Retreat at the International Buddhist Temple in Fall 2018

Author: Wanda Chu My name is Wanda Chu and I come from Toronto. Between September 30 and October 7, 2018, I attended a dynamic and inspirational Dharma Cultivation retreat in Vancouver hosted by the International Buddhist Temple of Canada and the Vinaya, Samadhi and Prajna Lecture Hall of Hong Kong. The 70 participants came from Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, England and other places of the world. It is the first Buddhist retreat I have been to. Meditation The idea was for all of us to spend a whole week living a monastic life and learn to calm the mind by practicing basic Buddhist philosophy. A big part of the week-long retreat was the cultivation of Zen through medication. In strict accordance with the Buddhist tradition, we got up at 4:00 am each morning and spent between two to four hours a day on sessions held in the Meditation Hall. As...

The Land of Fragrance Accumulation

Translated by: Andrew Yang Someone just starting to follow Buddhism asks: What is the state of being a Buddha like? What is reaching Nirvana like? What Buddhist scriptures tell us is, in fact, often abstract and mysterious. Take "Nirvana": it is interpreted as neither germinated nor terminated, and neither produced nor destroyed. Such terms are so obscure that one wonders if they could be adequately explained in modern language and made thoroughly understandable to us. Indeed, the state of being a Buddha or reaching Nirvana is beyond description by any language. The effect of using words to express the truth of things is often limited at any rate, usually one-faceted and generally deficient. Hence, many Buddhist texts employ adjectives such as "unimaginable" and "unspeakable" to imply limitations inherent in language. For one thing, personal emotions may not be totally conveyable by words, let alone the state of Buddhahood. Research has...

Living Compassion: Stories from Guangxi, China

Translated by: Andrew Yang During the summer vacation, our volunteers of Living Compassion in Guangxi, China have worked tirelessly visiting families of the aided students to learn about how they have been faring and found that the students and their families are going through delightful changes. Here are just a few of their stories to share with you. When outstanding student Tan Huimei was accepted by a reputed high school, everybody thought it was good news. But her family was too poor to pay her tuition, so she had to drop out to help her father with farming instead. Since the future of rural girls lies usually in being married away, Huimei was sad and constantly in tears. As Living Compassion learnt her story, we went to persuade her father that the more girls learn at school today, the more promising their life would be in future, so marrying was...
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